CamCRAG is a registered charity (1170180) who send regular convoys of volunteers and aid from the Cambridge region to help refugees in Europe. We collect donations, hold fundraising events, fund projects overseas and raise awareness of the refugee crisis.
CamCRAG is a registered charity (1170180) who send regular convoys of volunteers and aid from the Cambridge region to help refugees in Europe. We collect donations, hold fundraising events, fund projects overseas and raise awareness of the refugee crisis.

Stand Together with Refugees

CamCRAG is proud to be one of over 250 organisations supporting the Together With Refugees campaign, which is calling on the UK Government to implement a more humane asylum policy and rethink the Nationality and Borders Bill, which is due for its second reading in parliament this summer.

How you can help:

  • Share your views and links to the resources on this page with your friends and on social media, using the hashtags #TogetherWithRefugees and #WhoWeAre
  • Sign the petition at onestrongvoice.org.uk calling for a fairer and more accountable asylum system in the UK
  • Write to your MP asking them to oppose the Bill at its second reading and instead support a fair and functional reform of the UK asylum system. You can find out who your local MP is at www.writetothem.com. Below are links to briefings on the bill, and a template letter you may want to copy if you live near Cambridge.

Briefings on the Nationality and Borders Bill (all PDF files)

Template letter to your local MP

“I am writing to you regarding the second reading of the Borders and Immigration Bill on 19 July. It is a pity that the results of the public consultation on the New Plan for Immigration have not been made public to inform Parliamentary discussion of the new Bill, as I understand many legal and social reform experts have made important points about it. 

As you know, Cambridgeshire is an area with a large but invisible immigrant community, because they are often white, educated and economically very productive. Cambridge also has a long history of welcoming people seeking refuge, from Belgians displaced by the First World War, Jewish academics and Basque children fleeing the rise of fascism in Europe, to Vietnamese Boat People and dissidents from the former Eastern bloc, South Africa and Chile. This is something many of us are very proud of. Cambridge would simply not be the economic, intellectual and scientific powerhouse that it is without immigrants, some of whom arrived seeking asylum. Cambridgeshire is not anti-refugee so I hope you will reflect that with your vote.

The Home Secretary has stated that this Bill should make the system simpler, fairer and quicker. I think everyone is aware that the asylum system needs reform but it is also quite clear that the bottleneck is with the Home Office and its decision-making: Asylum claims have been falling over recent years but the backlog has risen. Surely this would be the place to begin reform, rather than trampling on our honourable traditions of sanctuary by instituting a two-tier system whereby how someone arrives to seek asylum is more important than why.

The new Bill will not streamline or improve the current system because much of it, according to the United Nations, contravenes international law, is impracticable or unethical. Denying the opportunity to appeal poor decisions and penalising traumatised people if they are viewed as uncooperative make miscarriages of justice more likely and will make lengthy and costly legal proceedings inevitable.

I am asking you, therefore, to speak for the majority of the British people who support reform but stand by the principle that those who need protection should get it. This should apply to anyone who arrives in the UK, by whatever means, who has a well-founded fear of persecution or harm in their home country.”